Tag Archives: quick

Mini Jam Tarts (leftover pastry)

This recipe (barely a recipe) used left over scraps of pastry from a pecan pie that Jack and I made a few days ago – that recipe soon to follow. Instead of throwing away the excess pastry left over from lining a fluted flan tin I suggested making some mini tartlets and I’m very glad we did!

A perfect aperitif before the real pie is ready.

  • Use your left over pastry (we had sweet shortcrust but regular shortcrust would work well too) and combine back into a ball and roll out.
  • Cut circles (using a circle cutter a bit bigger than the size of holes you have in your pastry dimple tin) from the pastry, brush the tin with some melted butter and pop the  pastry circles in. Top with a small square of grease proof paper/tinfoil and then add in a few baking beans.
  • Blind bake for about 10 minutes with the beans (around 180C I think the oven was) then remove the beans and paper or foil and return to the oven for another 5 or until golden enough.
  • Put in your chosen filling. We used a strawberry jam and also a strawberry and vodka jam, along with a little blob of creme fraiche.
  • Chuck back in the oven and forget about them for a while (that’s what we did! Very approximate and botch recipe really).
  • Eat up! WARNING even when out of the oven for 10 minutes the jam will still be exceedingly hot and you will burn your tongue, even when you think you have waited long enough. Apologies. It’ll still be scrummy and you’ll wonder why you bothered going to all the effort of making an actual pie or whatever else your pastry was leftover from.

Catriona

Advertisements

Moules

For Jack, Hannah and I, Moules are reminiscent of holidays spent on the Ile de Ré. Alongside Andy’s chilli and lime prawns, bought fresh from the market that morning, this is a staple  lunch time meal before heading to the beach.

Jack made Moules for himself and I a month or so back, maybe yearning warmer weather, classic flavours and outdoor cooking whilst we were hunkering down to a typical February in Edinburgh evening, avoiding the rain and dreary cold. It was also inspired by recent visits to the Mussel Inn on Rose Street in Edinburgh, of which the menu is largely a selection of mussels, oysters and fish, good bread and good frites. A firm favourite, cheap enough for students, too.

Simplest of soul foods, this crock of mussels was just cooked with shallots and garlic, then steamed in its juices with a sauce of white wine, cream and lots of parsley. Served with great hunks of bread on the side, this is fast, beautiful food.

Catriona

DIY Pot Noodle

Taken from the River Cottage Veg: Everyday! book, this recipe is a fantastic lunch or dinner solution for me when I’m in the studio late and need sustenance. Endless variations, with noodles as well as the veg and flavours to choose from, rice noodles are particularly good. My variation included bits I had in the fridge, mushrooms, spring onions, kale, fennel and some frozen peas. Hugh suggests a Kilner for the pot, I used my Aladin Bento box, separating the wet from the dry ingredients in the compartments.

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s DIY ‘pot’ noodles

“I first experimented with these when I was looking at ways to improve workday lunches.  However the concept works equally well as a fast and very satisfying supper. It’s important to find the right kind of noodle – one that will soften nicely in boiling water from the kettle without the need for pan-cooking. I find flat, thin, quick-cook egg noodles fit the bill very well. The ‘pot’ should be covered once the water is added…with this in mind, a sealable heatproof jar, such as a kilner, is ideal.

1 nest thin, quick-cook egg noodles

1tsp vegetable bouillon powder

A big pinch of soft brown sugar

1 small carrot, peeled and very finely sliced

3-4 spring onions, finely sliced

6 sugar snap peas or frozen petit pots

1 leaf of spring greens/green cabbage/leaves pak choi, shredded

1/2 tsp freshly grated ginger

1/2 garlic clove, grated

1/4 red or green chilli, finely chopped

2 tsp soy sauce

juice of 1/2 a lime

Put all the ingredients, except the soy sauce and the lime, in a ‘pot’. Pour over boiling water to cover, and leave for 8-10 minutes covered. Stir, add the soy sauce and lime juice to taste and eat. ”

Catriona